STUDENT NAME

STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
REFERENCE
http://www.academia.edu/21401767/Y_601_1695_CYP_Core_3.3_Understand_how_to_safeguard_the_wellbeing_of_Children_and_Young_People_Y_601_1695_1._Understand_the_main_Legislation_guidelines_policies_and_procedures_for_safeguarding_Children_and_Young_People
NOTE
BLACK COLOUR IS FINAL ANSWER
Page 1
STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Assignment 2
Q1.1. Outline current legislation guidelines, policies and procedures within own UK home national affecting the safeguarding of children and young people:
Current legislation
The current legislation for safeguarding the welfare of children and young people is the Working Together to Safeguard Children 2006 Act. This Act is applied in both England and Wales and authorised guidance on how organisations and individuals should work together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people in accordance with the Children Act 1989 and the Children Act 2004.

This policy has been developed in accordance with the principles established by the Children Act 1989 and 2004 and in line with the government publications “Working together to safeguard Children- 2010 framework for the Assessment of Children in need and their families 2000. What to do if you are worried and if a child is being abused 2003.
United Nations Convention in the Rights of the Child 1989- this act ensures that children have a right to be aware of their rights and that they have equalled rights and will be accepted for who they are. This act includes the right to protection from abuse, the right to express their views and to have them listened to and the right to care. It also includes services for disabled children and children living away from home.

The Children Act 1989- this act requires that parents and professional must work and to ensure thw safety of the child. The aim of this act is to simplify the laws that are already in place, which protect children and young people in the UK however, it also makes provisions for instances when parents and families do not co-operate with statutory bodies.

The Education Act 2002- this sets out the responsibilities of of those working in school such as Governing bodies, Local Education Authorities (LEA’s), qualified teachers ,staff , support staff who are carrying out specific work relating to teaching and learning to ensure the safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people and free from harm.

STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Assignment 2
Q1.1. Outline current legislation guidelines, policies and procedures within own UK home national affecting the safeguarding of children and young people:
The Children Act 2004 – it defines parental responsibility and encourages partnership working with parents. This did not replace or amend the Children Act 1989, but sets out the process for providing services to children so that every child can achieve the five outcomes described in the “Every Child Matters” green paper. Be healthy, Stay safe, Enjoy and achieve, Make a positive contribution, Achieve economic well-being. It requires local authorities to take the lead through multi-agency children’s trusts, to develop a children and young people’s plan and to set up a shared database of children, containing information relevant to their welfare
Working together to safeguard children 2006/2010 – this sets out the duties of organisations and individuals should work together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people in accordance with the Children Act 1989 and Children Act 2004, protecting children from harm and enhancing their welfare under this legislation depends on a shared responsibility and effective working relationship between different agencies.

The Children’s Act 2004- this sets out the revised legislation for physical punishment that hitting a child is an offence if it causes mental harm or leaves a lasting mark
CAF common assessment framework – helping to identify individual needs revised arrangements for sharing information (Data Protection Act 1998 the Eight Principles) The outcomes for ECM – Every Child Matters, a green paper that emerged from the report of Lord Laming, made in response to Victoria Climbie’s terribly tragic death. What To Do If You Are Worried A Child Is Being Abused 2003 is national guidance that brings together the content from Working Together To Safeguard Children and the Framework For The Assessment Of Children In Need and Their Families 2000.

STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Assignment 2
Q1.1. Outline current legislation guidelines, policies and procedures within own UK home national affecting the safeguarding of children and young people:
The CRB OR DBS Disclosure and Barring Service
Staff working with children and young people must be check and passed CRB or DBS to ensure they are suitable to be in the school environment. It is an executive non-departmental public body, sponsored by the Home Office. This involves training and ensuring teachers and support staff is aware of their duties and in recognising the signs of child abuse. Children are not left on a one to one basis with a teacher or support worker in case of allegations of abuse. Any suspected abuse is reported to a designated teacher, where investigating agencies may become involved
Local Safeguarding Children Boards (LSCB)
A LSCB is responsible for ensuring that all organisations in each local area will co-operate to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people. These policies work in line with the Every Child Matters program that each childs has the rights to be healthy, stay safe, enjoy and achieve, make a positive contribution and achieve economic well- being.

The UNCRC – The United Nations Convention on the rights of the child.
See attached Safeguarding policy
STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Q1.2. Explain child protections within the wider concept of safeguarding children and young people:
Safeguarding children is central to everything we do as a staff working with children we aim to achieve and promote a warm and secure environment where children and young people feel cared for and secure.

The school has a legal obligation to provide safe learning environment of children. Everyone who comes into contact with children has a role to play. Safeguarding is about protecting children and young people from abuse and neglect, maltreatment from any form harassment, crime, and bullying and force marriages. Any service that works with children or young people has a wider role than just protecting them from abuse and neglect. In order to protect and keep children and young people safe from harm and abuse, the board of governors has a legal duty to provide written policies and procedures to ensure the security and well – being of its pupils. The school should practice, the wider forms of safeguarding risk assessments such as providing safe environment and resources inside and out of the school, adhering to policies, procedures and legislations for example health and safety, fire drills. Professionals working with children and young people example teaching assistants, volunteers, outside agencies are all checked with DBS, wearing ID badges to identify visitors, signing in and out of the work place, making sure other adults are present when in close contact with certain children, adhering to ICT and on-line safety issues, “E-safety”. These days, a large number of children and young people use computers and either have access to or own a mobile phone. Some may even use their game console to connect with others via internet. Technology has advanced a lot in years gone by and have had a positive effect on children and young people, however there are risk that come with being available online through gaming or mobile phone, such as: physical danger or contact with paedophiles. Adults working with children should also be fully trained in safeguarding children by a nominated safeguarding adviser in order to develop their understanding of the signs of abuse or neglect.

In our school all staff and governors are required to have training in safeguarding and Child protection annually.
Ofsted include this in their inspection.

Dealing with Suspicion or Disclosure of Abuse and Action to be taken
Whenever a member of staff suspects that a child has suffered abuse or is at risk of suffering abuse. The staff must inform the head teacher or deputy teacher immediately.
Handling Disclosures:
Always stop and listen straight away to someone who wants to tell you about incidents of, or suspicion of abuse
Be alert to the fact that when a child discloses information about abuse to a member of staff, it may be done obliquely rather than directly and maybe limited in detail.

Children and young people often tell other young people, rather than staff or other adults, about abuse and these young people may then pass this information to staff.

An abused child is likely to be under severe emotional stress and the staff member may be the adult with whom the child feels safe to talk.

When the child discloses in confidence, the member of staff will need to display tact and sensitivity in responding.

The member of staff will need to reassure the child, and retain his/her trust? whilst explaining the need to inform other professionals.

In any discussion with the child:
Be accessible and receptive listen carefully, take it seriously , Reassure the child that she is right to tell, negotiate getting help, find help quickly Make careful records of all that was said? using the child his own words as soon as is practicable following the disclosure, Date, time and sign the record. This record may be used in subsequent legal proceedings.

Do not:
Jump into conclusions directly question the child .Try to get the child to disclose all of the details , speculate or accuse anybody , Make promises you cannot keep, Ask leading questions that could give your own idea of what may have happened. Do not prompt words to use (e.g. Did he do it to you”). Instead ask (what do you want to tell me? or Is there anything else you want to say) Give a guarantee that whatever has been said will be kept confidential. If you are told about abuse you have a responsibility to report it (see below). If asked explain that if you are going to be told something very important that involves the young woman’s safety and it needs to be sorted out? you will need to tell the people who can do this? but that you will only tell people who have to know. Discuss with the manager whether any steps need to be taken to protect the person who has told you about the abuse. (This may need to be discussed with the person who told you).

Top responsibilities of settings consist of:
Choosing a named senior member of staff to be in charge of safeguarding Making sure that all the adults that have frequent and unsupervised access to children is CRB checked and registered with the ISA (Independent Safeguarding Authority) Keeping a record of all the checks carried out on staff and volunteers Informing the ISA if they believe any person who has had involvement with a setting is a threat to the safety of children or young people Ensuring all staff and volunteers have regular safeguarding training Ensuring the minimum requirement for the ratio of staff to children is met In group settings, ensuring there are always at least two staff present – even if one child is late being picked up, two staff must be available Making sure there is always a qualified first-aider present
The Children act 2004
After the tragic death of Victoria Climbiè in 2000, it was realised that the services that were set out to identify, protect and safeguard vulnerable children were still not working. In 2003, the Laming Report criticised the approach to protecting children in our society. This resulted in a green paper, known as Every Child Matters, which then led to the Children Act 2004 in England, and other similar bills in all four UK countries. There are four main features of the Children Act 2004, they are:- Lead counsellors for children’s services with political responsibility for local child welfare. A new Common Assessment Framework to help agencies to identify welfare needs. Working together to safeguard children 2006/2010
STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Q1.3. Analyse how national and local guidelines, policies and procedures for safeguarding affect day to day work with children and young people:
It is important that all staff working at school setting have a responsibility and be able to understand and recognise if children are at risk or harm. In our school the welfare of the child is paramount and safeguarding children is the primary policy. Our school have a clear policies and procedure that cover all aspects of safeguarding such as; health and safety, child protection and risk assessment. There should be risk assessment from time to time to make sure all children and young people are safe and free from any threats inside school premises.

Our school also employ policies such as: Arrivals and Departures Door Safety policy, Photography and Recording Devices policy and policies for recording Accidents, Incidents, Pre-existing Injuries and Concerns for a Child to ensure children’s safety whilst in our care and make sure that all incidents within the setting as well as incidents where children arrive with injuries are recorded and monitored. We also follow strict personnel policies such Safe Recruitment and Staff.

The Education Act 2002 poses a duty on education authorities to promote and safeguard the welfare of children and young people. All staff in our school must be aware of the child protection procedures at all times, such as how to spot the signs of abuse, how and who to report my concerns, how to maintain a safe school environment, be aware of the health and safety of children and to be able to undertake any training required by school.

Child Protection: in our school policies and procedures for safeguarding it states that all staff, volunteers and students should be properly vetted and that DBS checks should be carried out. Also, we always make sure that people who pick up children are their parents/care and that if parents can’t pick up their child they must inform the office or the teacher of the name of the person who pick up their child. Staff/volunteer working in our school produces a DBS checks before they allowed working to make sure no criminal convictions.

Risk assessment: Is an important factor in safeguarding children. Staffs working at school must see to it that all doors and gates are locked to avoid unauthorised person going in or could a child leave the premises without noticing. Also, in my day to day work at school I always see to it that children are safe. I make sure that before I carry out any activity with children and young people, I will make sure the room is safe, for example, if I were to plan an activity, such indoor or outdoor game. I would need to risk assess the potential danger like checking all equipments, play ground etc. Likewise, if I were plan to an activity such as art and craft activity I would need to risk assess the potential danger of scissors, small objects like beads, buttons etc.
Ensuring the voice of the child or young person is heard
Working together to safeguard Children’ explains that staff working with children and young people should be aware safeguards and protects children and young people. Within the school setting we must be aware that we have a clear and defined role in relation to child protection. Professionals working with children and young people should be fully trained in safeguarding by a nominated safeguarding adviser and have the opportunity to receive training in order to develop their understanding of the signs and indicators of abuse or neglect. In my school, training is mandatory annually to refresh and updates any new legislation. It also has the benefits of reminding staff of their responsibilities.

We should also be aware of the importance of listening to children and young people particularly when they are expressing concerns about their own safety or other children’s welfare.

Procedures must be in place for recording concerns and incidents if a child discloses information regarding his/her welfare. We must make a record of exactly what the child has said, in their own words, reporting it to the safeguarding officer, ensuring that these records are kept confidentially in a locked cupboard separate from pupil records.
Policies and procedures should be regularly monitored and reviewed, to ensure that they are being followed through consistently, monitoring the actions of staff senior managers need to monitor the actions of the
STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Q1.4. Explain when and why injuries and serious case reviews and required:
The importance of partnership working to safeguard is that agencies and other professionals need to work together; it starts with government legislation right through to local working. Each professional or agency will have a different role of expertise so vulnerable children will need coordinated help from health, education, children social care and the voluntary sector and often the justice services so its important that there is good communication within all the different services available. Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children depends on effective partnership working between agencies and professionals all people involved in the welfare of a child have a duty to safeguard them. Police, health, visitor, GP, hospital, child minder, nursery, school, after school club, leisure groups such as football, swimming, brownies, social worker, family, friends, neighbours and the local community are all responsible for safeguarding our children and young people and its important we all work and communicate together. The common assessment framework provides a way for early intervention for children before it reaches crisis point. It is a shared assessment and planning framework for all communication and that information is shared between different professionals and organisations. The assessment framework centres on child safeguarding and promoting welfare. practitioners to use who work with children. Its aimed at helping with
hope this helps and gives you some ideas x
It starts with government legislation right through to local working. Each professional or agency will have a different role of expertise so vulnerable children will need coordinated help from health, education, children social care and the voluntary sector and often the justice services so its important that there is good communication within all the different services available. Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children depends on effective partnership working between agencies and professionals all people involved in the welfare of a child have a duty to safeguard them. Police, health, visitor, GP, hospital, child minder, nursery, school, after school club, leisure groups such as football, swimming, brownies, social worker, family, friends, neighbours and the local community are all responsible for safeguarding our children and young people and its important we all work and communicate together. The common assessment framework provides a way for early intervention for children before it reaches crisis point. It is a shared assessment and planning framework for all communication and that information is shared between different professionals and organisations. The assessment framework centres on child safeguarding and promoting welfare. practitioners to use who work with children. Its aimed at helping with
According to the local safeguarding board regulations 2006, serious case reviews will be required in situations where a child has died due to known or suspected abuse or neglect is thought to be involved. Sometimes reviews may be carried out where a child has been seriously harmed or suffered life threatening injuries. It looks at lessons that can help prevent similar incidents from happening in the future.

Serious case reviews are not part of any disciplinary process, but may highlight information which may indicate that one or more agencies should consider disciplinary action within established procedures; a SCR may be conducted at the same time, but should be separate from disciplinary action. Serious care reviews are set up to see what lessons can be learnt from the death about the way in which local professionals and organisations work separately and together to help safeguard and promote the welfare of the children and young people. It is also set up to improve how they can work better together to ensure nothing like that happened again.

In some cases it may be necessary to initiate disciplinary action as a matter of urgency to safeguard and promote the welfare of other children.When a Child dies or is seriously harmed and abuse or neglect is known or suspected. The Best priority must be to consider immediately whether there are other children who are likely to be placed in the same situation. Like for example’s Baby Peter.

Baby Peter was born on the 1st March 2006; he suffered severe injuries which were inflicted whilst he was in his mothers care. His mother pleaded guilty to causing the death of a child and she and her lodger were found guilty on the 11th November 2008. Peter was part of a multi- agency child protection plan and was known to have been seen more than 60 occasions by professionals before his death on August 3rd 2007 aged just 17 months.

The agencies involved were too willing to believe Peters’ mothers account of events. They seemed to be very trusting of Peter’s mother who was reinforced by her presentation and behaviour such as; co-operating with professionals and appointments, positive response to offers of help, initiation of communications with professionals, relaying information between them. After the Baby P incident there were many things which were looked into and the agency were found to be; lacking urgency, lacking thoroughness, insufficiently challenging to the parent, lacking action in response to reasonable interface, insufficiently focussed on the child’s welfare, based on too high a threshold for intervention and based on expectations that were too low.

Overall the result of the Baby P incident meant a review on the child protection plan.

Other parts of the UK have their own systems in place to learn from cases. We always follow and abide by guidelines and work with law especially it is regard with protection of a child to make sure all children are safe. For example at school, if we are concerned about a child we must inform the designated senior officer without delay and record any information regarding our concerns. Everything should be recorded on the same day on a cause of the concern and any information regarding the concern should be kept in the manager’s office in a locked cabinet. So the agencies can make a serious case reviews about what happen if parents failed their duties and the child is suffering from abuse or neglect.

Serious case reviews are crucial as they examine all agencies involved to ensure that they are actively involved and working together as they should be. When professionals are found to be negligent in their involvement or procedures, the review is able to highlight where the mistakes were made.

STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Q1.5. Explain how the processes used by own work setting or services comply with legislation that covers data protection, information handling and sharing:
Information sharing is vital to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and young people. A key factor in many serious case reviews has been a failure to record information, to share and to understand its significance and take appropriate action.

In our school all information collected and held in relation to the pupils who are in attendance is kept safe and secure by using passwords on the computer and it can only be accessed by those who are in charge of it. The school only collects information that is used for a specific purpose, i.e. the children’s address and parent/carer contact information. The school ensures the information they require is relevant and accurate. The school ensures the information is kept up to date, by sending letters out to parent/carers to remind them to update information since the last academic year and also in newsletters they remind parent/carer’s they must notify the school in any changes, i.e. change of address or telephone number etc. the information is kept for as long as the child is in attendance at the school and after which they will delete the files containing the personal data and shred and paper documents. The information is available to the pupils should they wish to view it. Some of the children in our school whose are on the child protection register are only available to the designated safeguarding officer. If the safeguarding officer has been notified of some child protection issues in relation to any child then they must disclose it to the child’s teacher in confidence to ensure the information shared is in the strictest confidence. The data collected must be kept at all times on the premises to ensure it does not become public knowledge. If the information needs to be shared with external agencies then it must be done appropriately and by using their discretion at all times.
It is not bad to share information if it is for the safety of a child or young people. In some situations, sharing information is the solution to improve the beneficial outcomes for all children. It is important to facilitate early intervention for safeguarding children. Staffs working with children should know and understand what to do about children who are at risk of abuse or neglect. It is essential to enable early intervention if the child is at risk of suffering harm. All data protection should be taken seriously and kept on secured computers. All staffs should have their own passwords to access the network.
STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Q2.1. Explain the importance of safeguarding children and young people:
It is important to safeguard children and young people because no one deserves to be abused whether it is physical, sexual or emotional abuse. We have a duty to protect child or young person from harm. Every child deserves to live without the fear of harm, abuse or maltreatment. Safeguarding children is paramount to promoting the welfare of children and protect them from harm. Everyone who comes into contact with children and facilities has a role to play in protecting children from maltreatment. To make sure that children grow up in consistent provision of safe and effetive care to enable all children have the best outcomes of protection.
If we protect children from harm they are more likely to grow up into confident members of society. Children with a disability are three times more likely to experience abuse and neglect and it’s up to us as practitioners to recognise the signs and symptoms to protect all children.

No one deserves to be abused whether it is physical, sexual or emotional abuse and no child or young person deserves to be neglected and we as a society have a duty to protect them from harm. Every child deserves to live without the fear of harm or abuse. If we protect children from harm they are more likely to grow up into confident members of society. Children with a disability are three times more likely to experience abuse and neglect and it’s up to us as practitioners to recognise the signs and symptoms to protect all children.

Section 16 of the Children Act 2004, which states that local authorities and each of the statutory partners must in exercising their functions relating to social safeguarding Children Boards. Have regard to any guidance given to them by the secretary of state.
In our school all staff and volunteers working with children are DBS checked. Safeguarding training is mandatory for all staff who work directly with children and young people in our school.

STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Q2.2. Explain the importance of person-centred approach/inclusive approach:
The importance of a child or young person’s centred approach is to understand that every child is different. The national framework of Every Child Matters was set up to support the joining up of services to ensure every child can achieve the five Every Child Matters outcomes. Support is offered to children to enable them to be healthy, stay safe, enjoy and achieve, make a positive contribution and achieve economic well-being. Children’s wishes should be taken into account during decision making to give them a sense of belonging and not to be made to feel as though it’s them who’s to blame.
Safeguarding is every one’s responsibility. A child- centred approach: for services to be effective they should be based on a clear understanding of the needs and views of children. Effective safeguarding systems are child centred. Failings in safeguarding systems are too often the result of losing sight of the needs and views of the children within them or placing the interests of adults ahead of the needs of children.
Children want to be respected. Anyone working with children should see and speak to the child, listen to what they say, take their views seriously, and work with them collaboratively when deciding how to support their needs.
A child-centred approach is supported by the Children Act 1989 (Children Act2004) This act requires local authorities to give due regard to a child’s wishes when determining what services to provide under section 17 of the Children Act 1989 and before making decisions about action to be taken to protect individual children under section 47 of the Children act 1989. These duties complement requirements relating to the wishes and feelings of children who are, or maybe, looked after including those who are provided with accommodation under section 20 of the Children Act 1989 and children taken into police protection (section 46 of that act) the Equality Act 2010 which puts a responsibility on public authorities to have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination and promote equality of opportunity. This applies to the process of identification of need and risk faced by the individual child and the process of assessment. No child or group of children must be treated any less favourably than others in being able to access effective services which meet their particular needs and the
United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), this is an international agreement that protects the rights of children and provides a child-centred framework for the development of services to children.

STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Q2.3. Explain what is meant by partnership working in the context or safeguarding
The importance of partnership working to safeguard is that agencies and other professionals need to work together; it starts with government legislation right through to local working.

Each professional or agency will have a different role of expertise so vulnerable children will need coordinated help from health, education, children social care and the voluntary sector and often the justice services so its important that there is good communication within all the different services available. Safeguarding is everyone’s responsibility, for services to be effective each professional and organisation should play their full part, everyone who works with children – including teachers, GPs, nurses, Midwives, health visitors, early years professionals, youth workers, police, accident and emergency staff, paediatricians, voluntary, after school club and community workers and social workers has a responsibility for keeping a child safe. Everyone who comes into contact with them has a role to play in identifying concerns, sharing information and taking prompt action, although all organisations that work with children and young people share a commitment to safeguard and promote their welfare, many organisations have specific roles and responsibilities to do so that are underpinned by a statutory duty or duties. The common assessment framework provides a way for early intervention for children before it reaches crisis point. It is a shared assessment and planning framework for all communication and that information is shared between different professionals and organisations.
Local authorities that are children’s services authorities have a number of special duties to organise and plan services and to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, these duties fall within the remit of the Director of Children Services (DCS), under section 18 of the Children act 2004, it is essential that the DCS, or senior managers reporting to the DCS, have relevant skills and experience in safeguarding and child protection and that they provide high quality leadership in this area as part of the delivery of effective children’s social care services as a whole, local authorities along with district councils NHS, bodies (Strategic Health Authorities, designated Special Health Authorities, Primary Care Trusts, NHS Trusts and NHS Foundation , Trusts , the Police ( including the British Transport Police) probation and prison services ( under the National Offender Management structure). Youth Offending Teams ), secure training centres and Connections have a duty under section 11 of the Children Act 2004 to ensure that their functions are discharged with regard to the need to safeguard and promote the welfare of children.

Early years providers have a duty under section 40 of the Childcare Act 2006 to comply with the welfare requirements of the Early Years Foundation stage, under which providers are required to take necessary steps to safeguard and promote the welfare of young children.
The Children and Family Court advisory and support service (CAFCASS) also has a duty under section 12(1) of the Criminal justice and Court services Act 2000 to safeguard and promote the welfare of children involved in family proceedings in which their welfare is, or may be, in question.
The UKBA is required under section 55 of the Boarders, Citizenship and Immigration Act 2009 to carry out its existing functions in a way that takes into account the need to safeguard and promote the welfare of children in the UK, the UKBA instruction arrangements to safeguard and Promote Children’s Welfare in the United Kingdom.

In order that organisations and practitioners collaborate effectively, it is vital that every individual working with children and families is aware of the role that the” have to play and the role of other professionals. In addition, effective safeguarding requires clear local arrangements for collaboration between professionals and agencies.
STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Q2.4. Describe the roles and responsibilities of the different organizations that may be involved when a child or young person has been abused or harmed:
Social care staff roles and responsibilities= is to provide support for vulnerable children and families. They share information about child’s potentially volatile, aggressive or abusive behaviour. As quickly as possible they should resolve any issues relating to child’d behaviour and let the school know about any significant changes affecting the child/young person’s life.

NSPCC (National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children) roles and responsibilities = to provide protection for children from being abused or neglected. Support for children and families in situations such as domestic violence, abuse and work with different organisations e.g. social services, police, family protection, education and health services. Provide a 24 hour support service to home-based childcare workers whether to refer a situation to social services.

A Health Visitor’s roles and responsibilities = to protect children from harm and abuse, they are one of the first to recognise children who are likely to be abused or neglected. Support the health of babies and children under the age of five. They have contact with many multi agencies and they support the work of the Local Safeguarding Board (LSCB). They are trained to recognise any risks that a child might have a sign of neglect or abuse. They visit the parents home to gather information and use their own judgement on when to share information with other agencies and they support and guide parents of young chidren.

General Practitioners (GP’s) roles and responsibilities = is to maintain their skills in recognising if a child is being abused or neglected. They need to follow all correct procedures if abuse or neglect is suspected. All GP’s Should have regular training and update their training when necessary.

Probation officer roles and responsibilities = is to supervise offenders to help support them not to re-offend and to protect others from harm. They supervise a large amount of offenders that have been identified as presenting potential risk of harm to children and also to protect familys of their own, who might be exposed to criminal or anti social behaviour. They also liase with Multi Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA), such as safeguarding children, procedures covering sex offenders, domestic abuse, child protection procedures.

Police roles and responsibilities = is to prevent crime and disorder and protect all individuals. The police have legislation to adhere to to protect the children. Children have the right to be fully protected (Children’s Act 2004 to safeguard and promote the welfare of children). All investigations can be sensitive so the police investigate and work with other organisations such as children’s social care to gather information needed. The police investigate child abuse cases (they have specialist training for this, Child Abuse Investigation Units (CAIUs). They can access information through IMPACT Nominal Index (INI) which enables them to get accurate information very quickly. (including child protection, domestic violence, crime, .The Police need to gather information and work with other agencies in case of criminal proceedings against suspected child abusers. All information will be passed on to the CPS
School roles and responsibilities = to create and maintain a safe learning environment. Provide policies and procedures to protect children e.g. child protection, physical contact, safeguarding, risk assessments, outings, injuries, illnesses and emergencies. The school should manage risks appropriately such as internet (including bullying/cyber bullying). The school designate d person has had specific training to deal with child protection issues. And be in contact with multi agencies to support the child and attend case conferences. Help to meet the health needs of children with medical conditions and provide accurate information on the child’s educational needs. All policies And Procedures should be followed at all times.

Psychology service roles and responsibilities = is to provide support for children who have experienced abuse or harm.

School Nurses role and responsibilities = is to lead professionals for CAF (Common Assessment Framework) and work with parents or carers in the care and treatment of vulnerable children. They provide in delivering the Healthy Child Programme. They aid children and deliver their help to individual groups. They have egualr contact with children from the ages 5-19
Social services roles and responsibilities = to provide support for vulnerable children and families and resolve any issues relating to child’s education and behaviour as quickly as possible
STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Q3.1 Explain why it is important to ensure children and young people are protected from harm within the setting:
It is important for any child in our care to be looked after in a secure, friendly manner. Children should be protected against harm or or any accident at school.
Parents need to trust the people that are looking after their children and feel confident that there are policies and procedures to adhere to. In our school we have child protection policies to make sure all children are safe in our school. It is essential that all staff accepts the responsibility of their role and also be protected in that role. In our school we followed these three policies and procedure.Child protection for example in our school if we notice that a child is feeling neglect or alone. We always approach the child. If there is any concern with the child we always ask the child. We listen carefully to what he/she says and we always take it seriously, reassure the child that she is right to tell. We make careful records of all that was said using the child own words as soon, date, time and sign the record. And give the records to the teacher. If it is really serious allegations then we straight away talk to the Head or Deputy Officer. We always listen to the child and shouldn’t jump into conclusions directly. Try to get the child to disclose all of the details. Ask leading questions that could give idea of what may have happened. Avoid asking prompt words instead ask “what do you want to tell me?” or is there anything else you want to say). Give a guarantee that whatever has been said will be kept confidential. We always follow the policy and procedure if abuse is suspected. Also, when taking a child to the toilet or a child needs to be undressed due to any accident, it is vital that another member of staff or child is present as to not allow any allegations of misconduct. Our school is also maintaining risk assessment to minimise or avoid accident. If it is outdoor game we always check any potential hazards such as as obstacles that may lead to accidentally tripping over; dangling cable, loose logs, broken toys, equipment should be in good working order, etc. Rooms should be spacious, well ventilated, well lit and temperature is comfortable. The legislation suggests a minimum of 16 degree centigrade, tables and chairs are usable, toys, storage are tidy, all equipments should be labelled, etc. We always follow fire evacuation procedures, and aware of the location of fire extinguishers, fire safety blanket and any other equipment. Fire exits always kept clear.
We also practice Health and safety such as washing hands before and after eating and toileting.
As an adult we should always set a good example by using a safe working practices and we should encourage others to do the same by following the school roles and procedures at all times.
STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Q3.2. Explain policies and procedures that are in place to protect children and young people, and adults who work with them:
In every school setting there should policy and procedure folder to look at if parents want to see how the school support and protect children. The policies and procedures are put into place to benefit staff, children, parents/carers and visitors. It is vital that all professionals follow safe working practices to ensure that not only children are protected but also themselves. These are the policy and procedures that we have at school: Safeguarding children and child protection policy and procedure, Information sharing policy and procedure, Whistle blowing policy and procedure, Nappy changing policy and procedure, Positive behaviour policy and procedure, Medication policy, only trained staff to store/ handle, book in/out and administer medication.

Safeguarding and child protection policy at school were we have a free flow system that enables the children to access each room/playground when they would like to. This also means that staffs are never in a closed room with children and all staff is aware that they move around where the children are playing. Sometimes children need physical contact of some form like if he/she hurts themselves. If they are upset for any other reason, it’s knowing and understanding when it is appropriate to give the contact. This is usually given when the child is upset, you can then encourage the child to play with you together with other children so the child gets distracted from why they were upset.

We always ask the child if we see any concern. We listen carefully and we always take it seriously, and reassure the child that she is right to tell. We make careful records of all that was said using the child own words as soon, date, time and sign the record. And give the records to the designated safeguarding officer. Staff shouldn’t jump into conclusions directly. Try to get the child to disclose all of the details. Ask leading questions that could give idea of what may have happened. Avoid asking prompt words instead ask “what do you want to tell me?” or is there anything else you want to say). Give a guarantee that whatever has been said will be kept confidential. We always follow the policy and procedure if abuse is suspected.
It is very important for parents to trust who is looking after their children, one of the main areas of gaining trust is having a CRB or DBS check, every staff member should be DBS checked fr the protection of children
Information sharing policy and procedure – staff should sign a confidentiality form declaring not to discuss any information regarding a child or staff members with people who it does not convern.
Risk assessment policy- staff and children to practice washing hands before and after eating and using toilet
Health and safety policy
Whistle blowing policy and procedure – all staff are aware of this policy where the word “Council” is used in our school. If we have any concern over practice, standards, safeguarding, finance or other area we should first approach any of the following with in the school: The Head teacher, The Deputy Head Teacher, The Chair of Governors, Link Safeguarding Governor
Nappy changing policy and procedure – there should be two members of staff present if the child needs to be undressed in event of accident
Positive behaviour policy and procedure-
Supervision of children on outings and visits policy and procedure-
food hygiene- staff and children to practice washing hands before and after eating and using toilet
fire drill safety
arrivals and departure including signing in of staff and visitors, daily register of children, knowing who is collecting children, password for collecting child,
all confidential documents should be locked away
Mobile phone policy – if child has a phone it should be handed at the office during arrival and be collected during home time
Food allergies, food intolerance, medical conditions, permissions for giving prescribed medication, applying sun cream – children’s name are displayed at the office, staff room, first aid room and kitchen to avoid mistake in giving food
Taking photos and use of photos are allowed BUT for personal use only
Medication policy, only trained staff to store/ handle, book in/out and administer medication.

STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
3.3Evaluate ways in which concerns about poor practice can be reported whilst ensuring that whistleblowers and those whose practice or behaviour is being questioned are protected.

Every school has whistle blowing policies and procedures and these policies are put in place to provide protection for the person against victimisation or reprisals from other members of staff (physical or verbally) when the concerns are genuine and accurate.
In order to keep our school as safe as possible it is a requirement of all staff that if they have reason to believe that a member of staff is behaving inappropriately over practice, standards, safeguarding, finance or other area. This information is passed immediately to the following with in the school: The Head teacher, The Deputy Head Teacher, The Chair of Governors, Link Safeguarding Governor
If the nature of the incident means it is not appropriate to involve the people above then the external Local Authority contacts deailed in the main policy and the Further Information Section of the Council’s policy must be contacted.

Any staff reporting a concern about malpractice or misconduct will be fully supported through this process and should be discuss in details. There are certain procedures to follow if any concerns rise
The whistle blower must think about what is disturbing them and why e.g. if there are any really suspicions or misconduct happened why he/she chooses to blow the whistle. All concerns should be reported to the relevant person without delay. Write those concerns down giving background details, names, witness names (if any) dates and places.Both parties can be offered help and support if required and all information disclosed for both whistle blower and the accused will be kept confidential and is investigated discreetly (Data Protection Act)
Preparations for any ramifications that could follow whistle blowing.

STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
3.4Explain how practitioners can take steps to protect themselves within their everyday practice within the work setting and on off site visits.

A significant element of a practitioner’s role in protecting themselves would be to read policies and procedures that are put in place to safeguard them and children or young people in their care. Staff should be aware of school’s policy on how to protect themselves, in our school staff is not allowed to be in a closed door with a child this is to avoid any misconduct allegation between the staff and the child. When working with children always see to it that we are working in an open door or visual access especially in one to one situations.
It is also against the law for public servants to take bribes. Staff need to take care that they do not accept any gift that might be construed as a bribe by others, or lead the giver to expect preferential treatment.There are occasions when children or parents wish to pass small tokens of appreciation to staff e.g. at Christmas or as a thank you and this is acceptable. However, it is not acceptable to receive gifts on a regular basis. It is inappropriate to give personal gifts to pupils too. This could be misinterpreted as a gesture to bribe. Staff should also be aware that such circumstances always carry a high risk of words or actions being misinterpreted and for allegations to be made against staff. There are occasions when it is entirely appropriate and proper for staff to have physical contact with pupils especially if the child hurts or distress. A “no touch” approach is impractical for most staff and may in some circumstances be inappropriate. When physical contact is made with pupils this should be in response to their needs at the time. Appropriate physical contact in schools may occur most often with younger pupils. In our school staff always used professional judgement at all times to avoid accusation and if in any event we always make sure that there are always two members of staff present if a child needs to be undressed in the event of accident. And we always record in the book. Physical contact should never be secretive, or for the gratifiation of the adult, or represent a misuse of authority. Also, sometimes children are collected late by a parent or carer. We always see to it that two members of staff must stay until the child is collected.

In the case of school trips either; educational or going to the park. Under the Health and Safety at work regulations Act 1999 staff always carries out a full risk of assessment of that visit. Staff /school send note to parents regarding the trip and and ask the parents sign if they are allowing their child to join in.

STUDENT NAME:Marisa Carpenter
STUDENT NUMBER:MACAR10084
COURSE:Teaching Assistant Level 3 Award
MODULE NUMBER:Unit 2
Q4.1. Describe possible signs, symptoms, indicators and behaviours that may cause concern in the context of safeguarding:
School and staff working with children must know how to spot signs and symptoms of abuse either physicaly, emotionally, sexual and neglect, domestic violence and bullying. It is school’s obligation to maintain a safe learning environment for children to safeguard from abuse and neglect. Staff must understand the school policies and procedures regarding abuse and neglect. If a child discloses any information regarding abuse or neglect we must listen and offer reassurance that it wasn’t their fault and explain clearly that she/he did the right thing.
Physical abuse occurs when someone deliberately causes physical harm to a child or young person. This might involve punching, kicking, biting, burning, scalding, shaking, throwing or beating with objects such as belts, whips, or sticks. It also includes poisoning, giving a child alcohol or illegal drugs, drowning or suffocation. Although children are liable to have accidents and from time to time to have injuries; but frequent injuries such as bruising on cheeks, ears, back, tummy, legs or multiple bruises in clasters that look like they have been caused by fingers , hand or an object, cuts and abrasions. Burns or scalds especially to the backs of the hands, feet,leg, genitals or buttocks like a circular cigarette burn, bite marks, scarring, fractures, head injuries that look like they have been caused by a blow or by shaking is a sign that a child is being physical abused.
Children who are being physically abused may show signs of changed behaviour such as reluctant to remove or trying to hide injuries under clothing, avoiding physical contact, depression and anxiety, being withdrawn, lack of trust afraid to go home, aggressive behaviour, difficulty in forming relationship and socialising, acting out aggression in play, lack of confidence, watches others carefully but does not participate also known as frozen watchfulness.

Indicators in the context of safeguarding are
Physical abuse, bruises to the eyes, mouth, or ears, fingertip bruising (grasp mark), bruises of different ages in the same place. Outline bruises (hand prints, belts or shoes). Bruising on non-mobile babies, Burns bites and scars or unusual shaped scars and fractures
Emotional abuse occurs when children are harmed emotionaly, when children’s emotional needs love and affection are not met then the child’s development is seriously damaged, the child is likely to experience difficulties with social and emotional development. According to NSPCC there are two ways of emotional abuse: active emotional abuse is an intention to harm a child such as rejecting, scaring, terrorising, exploiting, corrupting or verbally abusing a child. Passive emotional abuse is more difficult to detect. This might include the parent or carer behaving negatively to wards the child and not connecting emotionally with them, or expecting a child to act in a way that they are not emotionally mature.

Children who are being emotionally abused may show signs of changed behaviours thus may include low self-esteem and lack of confidence, parents constant negative or harsh attitude towards the child, fearful and distant relationship with the parent, excessive passive behaviour, difficulty making friends, being very wary of their parents mood, behavioural problems including learning difficulties, aggression (may be towards self e.g. head banging biting) attention seeking, demanding, stealing, lying, tantrums in children over 5 years old, indiscriminately affectionate may cuddle or sit on lap of an adult even if they do not know them, poor concentration leading to difficulties, toileting problems after previously being dry, overly upset by making a mistake, behaviour associated with comfort seeking in children over fiv, eating disorders
Children who are being emotionally abused may show signs of changed behaviour low self-esteem, attention seeking behaviour, nervous behaviour, continual rocking, hair twisting, delayed development, and self-mutilation, low self-esteem, attention seeking behaviour, nervous behaviour, continual rocking, hair twisting, delayed development, and self-mutilation.

Sexual abuse of a child is a persuaded or forced to take part in sexual activities or encouraged to behave in sexually inappropriate ways. It can happen to both boys and girls and babies, both men and women. It also includes behaviour that may involve any physical contact exposing children to pornography via media (photo, videos, DVDs and the internet or even having them witness a sexual act on others. Sexual abuse of children is more than just physical sexual contact and includes; touching of any part of the body in a sexual way regardless of whether clothed or unclothed, vaginal, anal and oral penetrative sex using any part of the body, encouraging a child to engage in sexual activity, including sexiual act with someone else, making a child to strip or maturbate, sexual activity infront of a child, encouraging child into prostitution
Signs that a child is being sexually abuse include; Sudden inexplicable changes in behaviour, becoming aggressive or withdrawn, unwillingness to be alone with a particular adult or show fear or reluctance to socialise, using sexual language, masturbating, depression and self- harm, fear of physical contact
Sexual abuse- recurrent urinary infections, genital and rectal itching and soreness, inappropriate behaviour regarding age and ability, inappropriate level of sexual knowledge, and sexual abusive behaviour toward others, lack of trust, regression, become isolated and withdrawn.

Neglect occurs when a family does not provide for a child’s basic everyday essential needs including food, clothes, keeping children clean, nurturing, keeping them warm or look after them. Children who have been neglected are often said to be failing to thrive because of a lack care and attention to their most basic need. Signs that a child is suffering from neglect include; lack of healthy food leading to malnourishment, obesity or hunger, unwashed and inadequate clothing, the child may not be cared for hygienically, they may be dirty and they may smell, the child may have skin infection and infestation which might go untreated e.g. headlice, this is likely to lead to bullying, the child may live in an unhygienic environment and frequently be unwell e.g.food poising is common, the child may be truant from school, leading to a lack of stimulation and education, absenteeism, anxious, difficulty in making friends , anti-social behaviour and early sexual activity and drug or alcohol misuse.

Neglect- undernourished, dirty skin and hair, dirty or soiled clothing, inappropriate clothing for the weather, hunger and stealing food, tireness, being withdrawn, being left unsupervised and not being given any medical care.

Domestic Violence at home has a huge effect on children who witness by actually being in the room, hearing it or seeing a parent’s injuries after the event. Children who witness domestic violence can affect children behaviour and their emotional well being and sometimes can affect their permormance at school. Sometimes children who experience domestic violence at home are more likely to be the victims and suffer from behavioural problems and more likey metal health problems later in life. They sometimes have difficulty in making friends because of their family background.
Bullying is not defined as a form of abuse in Working Together but there is clear evidence that it is abusive and will include at least one, if not two, three or all four, of the defined categories of abuse.

Recognising child abuse is not easy. It is not our responsibility to decide whether or not child abuse has taken place or if a child is at significant risk of harm from someone. We do however, have both a responsibility and duty, as set out in your organisation’s child protection procedures, to act in order that the appropriate agencies can investigate and take any necessary action to protect a child.

Q4.2. Describe the actions to take if a child or a young person alleges harm or abuse in line with policies and procedures of own settings:check settings policy for safeguarding at school
In our school staff makes sure know what to do if we are a child is being abused and how to take actions know who to contact to express concerns about a child’s welfare e.g.school policies and procedures such as safeguarding, child protection, whistleblowing and complaints. We stop and listens what the child or young person is saying and remain calm. Remember that an allegation of child abuse or neglect may lead to a criminal investigation, so don’t do anything that may jeopardise a police investigation, such as asking child leading questions or attempting to investigate the allegations of abuse. Just take what is being said and avoid asking leading question instead accept what the child is saying. Support and reassure that they did the right thing in telling. Agree not to keep secrets and do not promise confidentiality. Be aware of not condeming anyone, showing prejudice, bias or dismissing information. Where concerns arise as a result of information given by a child it is important to reassure the child but not to promise confidentiality.Record full information accurately about the child at first point of contact, including name(s), address (es), gender, date of birth, name(s) of person(s) with parental responsibility (for consent purposes) and primary carer(s), if different, and keep this information up to date.

Parents should be informed at the same time if there is a suspicion of abuse, unless this increases the risk of harm to the child or additional guidance has been given by the local safeguarding children board, whereby the investigating officers will contact and inform parents, feeding back to the setting within 48 hours of a refferal letting the setting know what is happening. The setting continues to support both child and family.

Where a child makes a disclosure of abuse a designated/named officer shares the concern with parents, makes informed decisions about the need for refferal and explains how the procedures work for maintaining each child’s confidential file – how all reports and records are kept & updated, the parent’s right to access the file, the way the setting reports its concerns, suspicions, makes refferals and the right for parent’s to make a complaint.
In schools, this information will be part of the pupil’s record.

Record in writing all concerns, discussions about the child, decisions made, and the reasons for those decisions
The child’s records should include an up-to-date chronology, and details of the lead worker in the relevant agency – for example, a social worker, GP, health visitor or teacher.

Follow up your concerns. Always follow up oral communications to other professionals in writing and ensure your message is clear.

Q4.3. Explain the rights that children, young people and their carers have in situations where harm or abuse is suspected or alleged:
Q5.1 Explain different types of bullying and the potential effects on children and young people:
Bullying is behaviour that hurts someone else – such as name calling, hitting, pushing, spreading rumors, threatening or undermining someone. It can happen anywhere – at school, at home or online. It is usuallyy repeated over a long period of time and can hurt a child both physically and emotionally. Bullying that happens online, using social networks and mobile phones, is often called cyber bullying. A child can feel like there’s no escape because it can happen wherever they are, at any time of day or night.
Emotional – being unfriendly, excluding in any games, tormenting e.g. hiding belongings, making faces etc.

Physical – pushing, kicking, hitting, punishing, or any use of violence
Racial – racial taunts, graffiti, gestures
Sexual – unwanted physical contact or sexually abusive comments
Homophobic – because of or focussing on the issue of sexuality
Verbal – name calling, sarcasm, spreading rumours, teasing,gossipingNon-Verbal abuse – signs or text messages
Exclusion- such as ignoring or isolating someone
Cyber -all areas of internet, such as mobile phones (calls or text), emails and social networking sites, chat room misuse (camera and video facilities) It can be hard for adults, including parents, to know whether or not a child is being bullied. A child might not tell anyone because they are scared the bullying will get worse. They might think that they deserve to be bullied, or that it is their fault.
You can’t always see the signs of bullying. And no one sign indicates for certain that a child’s being bullied
belongings getting lost- or damaged
physical injuries such as unexplained bruises
being afraid to go to school, being mysteriously “ill” each morning or skipping school
not doing as well at school
asking for, or stealing, money (to give to a bully)
being nervous, losing confidence, or becoming distressed and withdrawn
problems with eating or sleeping
bullying others.

Children and young people who bully are at increased risk of 7
substance misuse
academic problems
violent behavior in later life.

Children who witness bullying may show similar signs as children who are being bullied , they may:
become reluctant to go to school
be frightened or unable to act
feel guilty for not doing anything to help
Q5.2. Outline the policies and procedures that should be followed in response to concerns of bullying:
Each of the UK nations has its own anti-bullying legislation, policy and guidance. Policies must also comply with the European Convention on Human Rights.

The European Convention on Human Rights ECHR
The 1950 European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) is an international treaty which gives a set of rights to both adults and children. It was enacted in the UK as the Human Rights Act 1998. It protects individuals from the actions of public bodies (such as governments, local authorities and schools – although not necessarily private schools). If an individual thinks that their rights have been breached by a public body, they can take their case to court.

Rights set out in the convention include : the right to life, the right to be kept safe from torture and cruel treatment, freedom from slavery, the right to a fair trial, the right to respect for private and family life, and the right to an eduation, keeping children safe in education statutory guidance for schools and colleges
Published in April 2014, and updated in March 2015 by the Department for Education DfE. This statutory guidance sets out what schools and colleges in England should do, and the legal duties they must comply with, to safeguard andpromote the welfare of children (Department for Education, 2015) Preventing and tackling bullying
Advice for head teachers, staff and governing Bodies
Published in March 2014 by the Department for Education (DfE) This guidance gives school staff advice on preventing and responding to bullying as part of their behavior policy, covering:
the government’s approach to bullying
legal obligations and the powers schools have to tackle bullying
the principles underpinning the most effective anti-bullying strategies in schools.

The Education Act 2002
Places a duty on school governing bodies in England and Wales to promote the safety and wellbeing of children and young people in their care, all state schools must have a behaviour policy in place which includes measures to prevent all forms of bullying among pupils. The policy is decided by the school. Staff, parents and pupils must be made aware of it.

The special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001
Part 2 The special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001 amends Part ‘4 of the Disability Discrimination act 1995. It prohibits schools in England, Wales and , Sotland from discriminating against disabled children through admissions, education services or ex!lusions.

The Race relations (Ammendment ) Act 2000
ReQuires schools in England, Wales and ,Scotland to draw up a race equality policy and ensure that poli!ies donOt dis!ri(inate against ra!ial groups.

The Disaaility Discrimination Act 1995
Allows claims of discrimination due to disability to be brought in England, Wales and , Scotland. Part 4 of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 was amended to apply to schools by Part ; the special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001
Q5.3. Explain how to support a child or young person and their family when bullying is suspected or alleged:
It can be really distressing to discover that your child is being bullied. However hard it is, try to stay calm and don’t jump to conclusions. Your child may be really worried about talking to you about the bullying, and scared that it’ll make the situation worse. Explain to your child what bullying is, and ask if they’re being bullied. Keep calm, and listen carefully.They may feel really worried, scared, embarrassed or ashamed that they’re being bullied. If your child is being bullied they might be scared to ask for help, because they think it’ll make the bullying worse. Yet they know they can always talk to you, or another trusted adult such as a teacher or other family member. If they don’t want to talk to you, you could suggest they call Childline 0800 1111.

If your child is being bullied they may feel down, worried or lack confidence.Help them find things to do that make them feel good like listening to musi or playing sport. Give them opportunities to help build their confidence. Cyber bullying can be really hard for a child to deal with because they can feel like there’s no escape. Don’t stop them from using the internet or their mobile phone. It probably won’t help keep them safe and could stop them from telling you what’s happening
If your child is being bullied, you can talk to their school. It doesn’t matter whether the bullying is happening in school, outside or on the internet. All schools have a responsibility to protect their pupils from bullying. If your child is being bullied at a club, talk to the person in charge. You should:
arrange to meet with their teacher or club organiser take a notebook so you can jot down what’s said at the meeting – it will help you remember the main points later
tell them what effect the bullying is having on your child, and make it clear you won’t tolerate the bullying
ask for a copy of the school or clubs anti-bullying policy and what action they will take.

What to do if your child has seen bullying others
1.You may feel disappointed or horrified if you find out that your child has been bullying others. But try to keep calm and take some time to consider what you’ll do.

2. Children may not realise that what they’re doing is bullying. If they’ve been making offensive or unkind comments online they might not understand how much that could hurt someone.

3. Calmly explain that what they’re doing is unacceptable’.

4. Help them understand how what they’ve done feels – you could ask them how they think the other child felt, or ask them how they felt when someone said something unkind to them
5. Explain what you will do next, such as telling your child’s school, and what you expext them to do
6.Ask them whether they have any questions about why their actions need to change.

Q6.1. Explain how to support children and young people’s self-confidence and self-esteem:
Adults have got to take children seriously, listen to them, make them feel that they are important, encourage children to try things out for themselves (you start with young children, by being close by, so they know there is an adult there if they need them – this often gives them more confidence to try things). You praise and encourage and praise, if they say things such “I can’t do it”, or “it’s wrong again” when completing a jigsaw, you encourage them by saying they aren’t doing anything wrong they are trying/practising; you can tell them when you learnt knitting/cooking/skiing you had to try many times until you could do something, helping build children’s confidence, self-esteem and self-image – having those will help anyone (of whatever age) and build up resilience to try things out, not give in or up, learn that it’s perfectly normal to try some things often before they have accomplished something, but not worrying if they don’t succeed in everything. Self-esteem is how you think about yourself, being comfortable with how you look and how you feel. Being confident means feeling good about yourself?Your abilities and your thoughts sometimes your confidence can come and go depending on the situation you are in.
You might be really outgoing outside of school but be really shy in class, which is completely normal. At school you are surrounded by lots of different people and it can be difficult to speak up and be yourself, one way to start building confidence in school is by answering questions during lessons of your favourite subject. You could also help a friend who is struggling with a subject that you’re good at. Think of your talents and the things you enjoy doing then remind yourself of these whenever you feel down.

show them lots of love and be positive about them as a person – tell them what makes them spe!ial to you
let an example of a positive attitude when faced with challenges
encourage them to try new challenges themselves, and celebrate them for it. Phrases like “Well done, that was hard, and you managed it” are good. Take the steps small at first, then increase the challenges
Give praise for their successes, and don’t focus on areas where they have not done so well
Reassure them it’s OK to make mistakes and that it’s all part of growing up. If you make a mistake, admit it and say sorry, to show them getting it wrong is not the end of the world and happens to everyone
avoid being too critical and don’t put them down – if you are unhappy with their behaviour, say this but make clear that you still love them
Acknowledge their feelings and help them express their feelings in words for example, encourage them to say “I’m upset because) or” I feel happy when)
Use creativity to help the child express themselves – art, drama, music
help children discover and develop their talents, through clubs, groups and activities. Finding something they are good at provides a huge boost to their feelings of self-worth
Q6.2. Analyse the importance of supporting resilience in children and young people:
Even after very harsh or difficult life circumstances children have been known to thrive. Individuals spring back and survive by consciously and unconsciously engaging a complex array of resources and protective factors available to them through their environment as well as through their own personal attributes.

External or environmental resources that may be drawn upon by children and young people include relationships with family, with other caring adults and peers, school experiences, cultural beliefs and practices, success in sports and other social pastimes and activities. Internal resources include things like temperament, physical capacity, intelligenc, endurance or psychological strength.

Not all resilient Children and Young people display the same characteristics of resilience however there are a number of predictors of resilience many of which can be actively encouraged and taught
problem-solving skills and ability to focus
emotional and behavioral regulation
self-efficacy, self-worth and a positive self-perception
believing that life has meaning and hope
being involved with faith based or other group affiliations
feeling valued for some trait or ability
having friends who are accepted in the child’s circle
feeling connected to school and having an effective school experien!eliving in an effective community ( safe, with emergency services, recreation centre’s? options for young people)
experiencing the presence of caring, competent adults in their life (parents, carers, teachers, extended family members)
Encouraging experiences of success for the child will enhance their sense of mastery. A sense of mastery builds hope in children. It is important as well that they are assisted to realistically understand that mastery is not achieved instantaneously but is something that must be strived for and worked at. Once strategies that may be helpful to develop a sense of mastery in children and young people include:
Adventure education programs mimic the same internal and external factors required for resilience, and are a great way for children to experience mastery of a novel, challenging situation.


Encourage your child to use positive thinking: Teach them to say” I think I can” when something difficult comes up. Read stories and watch shows that model children demonstrating positive expectations in the face of difficulty.

Introduce the idea of breaking tasks into smaller steps and tackling them one at a time.

Encourage them to praise themselves for their achievements of the day each night before they go to sleep.

Talk with the about their strengths and give them a chance to elaborate, enhance and generalise these strengths. Demonstrate how a strength used in one context can be used in another.

specifically praise their practice and effort to achieve mastery.
Children need relationships with caring adults other than their parents or carers (such as teachers, ministers, neighbours). These supportive relationships influence and foster resilience because the perception or belief that support is available is in itself an aspect of resilience even if it is never actually accessed.It can assist to discuss your child’s supports with them so that they can be ready should a stressful event occur for example if they arrive home from school and the house is locked and no one is home discuss how they would utilise community supports e.g. neighbours, family members.
Practice what they would say to get the assistance they need in various situations. Who would they ring, what questions would they ask. Teach your child how to calmly explain what is upsetting them, speaking clearly and in non-accusatory language, using eye contact, thinking about and understanding the feelings of others in the situation and promoting empathy andsharing.
Assist your child to think about the consequences of actions or decisions they make e.g. “Are you sure about drinking this caffeinated drink so late in the evening? Remember you have an early swimming class and your squad relies on you to be on time”.

Give them choice so that they can understand consequences e.g. “If you put your favourite shirt out for the laundry , will have washed it ready for the next time you want to wear it. You can leave it in the corner if you choose but leaving it to be washed and dried at the last minute means it will most likely not be ready in time”.
Children vary in the way they react emotionally – some are more intense than others or more sensitive. Others have a wider window of tolerance and recovery whilst some will react more quickly or take longer to regain balance. Recovering from being upset and being able to moderate emotional reactivity are necessary for personal resiliency.

Helping your child with relaxation and self-talk that assists to settle their reactions along with breathing and other techniques so that they learn to “self sooth”.

educating your child or young person in how having a high level of emotional reaction leaves then vulnerable. They may think less clearly, or upset others who may then avoid them. Or they may even hurt others who may retaliate back so that relationships breakdown.

Helping them to realise that the longer it takes to recover the longer they will feel upset and uncomfortable.

Child counsellors/psychologists can assist children and young people develop techniques for identifying triggers, anticipating them and then managing their responses.

Discussing an upsetting event and helping them to identify what triggered their emotional reactivity. Getting them to work out some other ways they could have managed the situation will assist them with emotional flexibility and self-regulation
Q6.3. Explain why it is important to work with the child to ensure they have strategies to protect themselves and make decisions about safety:
Safety is important for all children and young people and preventing harm from occurring in the First place is the best way to keep children and young people safe. Children and young people should be able to enjoy safe environments wherever they spend their time. It is also vital that children, young people and their parents can develop a good understanding of risks to children’s safety and how to manage these.

Play and taking part in positive activities
Understanding and managing risk
A safe workforce
addressing new threats to children’s safety
helping local safeguarding Children boards to make a difference
road safety
Health visiting services
third sector engagement
In this chapter, we announce the following new commitments for the next three years:
the establishment of a new Child safety Education Coalition
to ensure that more children have access to fun and practical safety education opportunities;
the launch of a major new communications campaign on children’s safety, including targeted information for more vulnerable groups and public communications to encourage people to take responsibility for children’s safety; and
the creation of a new National safeguarding Unit for the Third Sector to provide advice and assistance to all third sector organisations on safer recruitmentprocedures, risk management in activity provision and anti-bullying policies.

All children and young people should feel safe and protected. We want them to enjoy their childhoods, to stay safe and have the freedom to grow and achieve their full potential
It is important that everyone – parents, practitioners, government – works together to create safe and accessible environments for children and young people wherever they are, whether at home, at school, at college, out playing, on transport, at nursery,in public spaces or in a youth club.
It is everyone’s responsibility to create these safe environments, so that all children and young people can enjoy and achieve. Keeping children and young people safe from harm is an integral part of wider work being undertaken to develop integrated children’s services.
In Every Child Matters, we set out an ambition for children’s services to work together to ensure that children can be healthy, stay safe, enjoy and achieve, make a positive contribution and achieve economic well-being. This is being achieved in local areas around the country by different services working together as a Team Around the Child(TAC), using the Common Assessment Framework and sharing information where necessary about children at risk of harm. Active communication and information sharing are vital for keeping children and young people safe. This helps identifiation of children and young people in need or at risk of harm and, in cases of concern about children’s welfare, will enable professionals to consider jointly how to proceed in the best interests of the child
It is important to ‘equip’ (or empower) children to ensure they have strategies to protect themselves and make decisions because if they don’t they may be vulnerable to abuse (of any sort).

From the outset we want to help children/yp gain confidence to speak up – either to say no, and keep safe and not putting themselves in vulnerable or dangerous places. – young people who may be old enough (or perhaps young but those allowed out/roam etc ) and failing this we need to get across that children should not keep secrets but tell a ‘safe’ person. They should be taught that no one should take advantage of them/do things that they know is not right.

Getting this across will be different for different ages and stages. For very young children you may talk of keeping safe by reading a story such as Red Riding Hood and this will give you an opportunity to talk of keeping safe, staying with their parents, not going off with others and remembering that they can always say no, and tell someone safe about it. The discussion from the story may lead onto general keeping safe and helping them to see how they can help themselves.

For older children/young people your language and the way you put it across
will depend on how you feel best to discuss/deal with this subject.

Children/you need to have good self-esteem and confidence and a good self image (so important to promote this from a young age) so they know they are important, should be respected by all and know that there are trusted adults their to help them and keep them safe – but that may be another question in your unit.

It is important that children have strategies to protect themselves and keep themselves safe as they are usually on their own when they find themselves in an unsafe position.
I’ll stop here otherwise it may cross over to other bits of your unit – how a setting can help children in other ways – knowing their body parts, having a body poster, looking out for signs/listening out for language/different/unusual behaviour or inappropriate for their age etc. Sometimes children are not safe in the very place they should be – home and that’s why it is an important part of care and education for children/yp to learn what is not acceptable (in a positive ad not frightening method) and how best to protect and keep themselves safe.

Strategies to help children protect themselves
What do we mean by ‘safe’? What ius acceptable behaviour and what is not? Childcare settings – together with agencies such as the NSPCC, Childline and Kidscape – are very important in educating children about looking after themselves. The important thing for all children to remember is that they should never feel uncomfortable about someone they are with or something being done to them.
Children and young people need support to be able to keep themselves safe. You can help by:
teaching them effectively about the dangers posed by some adults and how to minimise them, including the dangers arising from some aspects of electronic media.

teaching them effectively about the dangers involved with substance abuse
providing them with effective sex and relationship education, including sexual health risks, and supplementing this with impartial and confidential advice and guidance.

Best wishes
Q6.4. Explain ways of empowering children and young people to make positive and informed choices that support their well-being and safety:
Children and young people spend a lot of time online – it can be a great way for them to socialise, explore and have fun. But children do also face risks such cyber bullying or seeing content that’s inappropriate. That’s why it’s important for them to know how to stay safe online.

Whether you’re unsure about what happens online or are up to speed with new technology, it’s important that you talk to your child about staying safe. Taling to your child, openly? and regularly is the best way to help keep them safe online.
You might fnd it helpful to start with a family discussion to set boundaries and agree what’s appropriate. for you might need a more specifc conversation about an app or website your child wants to use or something you’re worried about.If you’re not sure where to start then here’s the advice you need – great ways to begin conversations to keep your child safe online.

Explore sites and apps together
talk about what might be OK for children of different ages. Ask your child what sites or apps they like. Write a list, and look at them together.

be positive about what you see? but also be open about concerns you have: “I think this site’s really good” or “?I’m a little worried about things I’ve seen here”.

talk to your child about what you think is appropriate – but also involve them in the conversation. Ask what they think is OK for children of different ages – they’ll feel involved in the decision-making.

be aware that your child might talk about friends who use apps or visit sites that you’ve decided aren’t suitable. Be ready to discuss your reasons, but recognise that they may not agree with you. Listen carefully for the reasons why
Go through a final list of sites you both agree are OK and work out
When you next discuss it
Talk about things they might see online which make them feel uncomfortable
Ask about things they, or their friends, have seen that made them feel uncomfortable:
Be specific. what exactly made them feel uncomfortable and why Is it people or animals being hurt ?Nasty comments about others?
link these too things in the real world, and explain that you’re always here to protect and help them online and off
Reassure your child that they can always talk to you about anything that makes them feel uncomfortable.

show them how to report or block on the sites and apps they use. (Net Aware) to find out how.

tell them you’ll help them to report anything upsetting they’ve seen, or to deal with online bullying.

Talkl about how they can stay safe on social networks
As your child if they know:
where reporting functions are
how to block someone
how to keep information private.
Show them how to do these things. Use Net Aware to help you. Talk about online privacy, and being Share Aware.
Explain that online behaviuor including sharing personal information – should mirror behavior in person.
Explain that talking to strangers isn’t always “bad”, but they should always be careful about what they share and sometimes people aren’t who they say they are.

Reassure them that you won’t overreact – you’re just looking out for them .Explain that you understand the internet is a great place to be and that you’re just looking out for them. Tell them they should speak up and not keep secrets if something is worrying them.

Reassure them that you’re interested in all aspects of their life. Say that you’d like to talk about stuff they ‘ve seen online, sites and apps they visit, and that you’ll share the things you’ve seen too.
Recognise that they’ll be using the internet to research homework
thsi question- Identify five points of good practice to support children and young people to empower themselves.- seems very repetitive in this unit about safeguarding. have i covered everything do you think? help please……

Children are empowered by knowledge of their world and the way it works. It allows them the ability, power and authority to make their own decisions and it is about giving them information that is sincere, respecting their views and acknowledging each child and young person as an individual.

Children need to know and understand that they have rights, as agreed by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, and that these rights mean that they do not have to suffer abuse or harm.

Settings and professionals can help children to learn how to make positive and informed choices that support their well- being and safety.

All professionals working with children need to support them to empower themselves in order to keep themselves safe, and this can be accomplished in the following ways:
•Provide children with information on safety according to their age and ensure that they understand the risks associated and the strategies to avoid danger. Allow them opportunities for them to take risks in which their independence and self -esteem are developed. Children can learn through stories (such as Jack & the Beanstalk) and through television programmes, about risk taking and consequences. Make sure that children know and understand the Keepsafe Code. (www.kidscape.org.uk/young-people/keepsafe-code)
•Ensure that children have positive relationships in order that they feel confident enough to speak to a trusted adult if they need help and that they know that help will always be given if needed. Provide non-judgmental support for them when they need help with worries or problems. Offer the child information about other sources of help including Childline and The Samaritans. Never tell a child that you will not tell anybody else if they disclose abuse or neglect. The correct authorities will need to be advised and the child will lose trust in adults who cannot keep their word.

•Think about using age appropriate language when speaking to the children e.g. children will often call different parts of the body different things depending on their age and what language is used in the home environment.

•Encourage opportunities that allow choices to be made with positive outcomes and the reasoning behind these choices. Examples of this are road safety, anti-bullying, healthy eating, putting rubbish in the bin – informed choices mean positive outcomes. Setting an example is very important for children to learn from trusted adults.

•Helping them to comprehend and respect the boundaries they might come across. Emphasizing issues when they arise in a positive manner, such as taking turns, pushing in, being patient and allowing other children to take their time and do things in their own way. Setting rules and explaining the sense behind the rules so that they understand rules are for a reason and are to be respected. Allow them to solve their own arguments whenever possible and listen to reasoning.

Professionals play a huge part in supporting children to empower themselves. Children need to develop holistically and if they are empowered they will have the confidence and self- esteem to do this and avoid situations which could put them at risk.

Q7.1. Explain the risk and possible consequences for children and young people of being online and using mobile phone:
Children and young people spend a lot of time online – it can be a great way for them to socialise, explore and have fun. But children do also face risks like cyber bullying or seeing content that’s inappropriate. Children and young people may see illegal or unsuitable content online, such as:
pornography
child abuse images
dangerous advice encouraging eating disorders, self-harm or suicide
excessive violence or race hate materials.

Some websites show illegal content, others that are legal might have unregulated advice or are meant for adults only
Children may come across this content by mistake, or they may look for it because they’re curious. Promises of special offers or prices can also draw young people in.

Some websites and games use age restrictions and checks to make sure that children don’t see unsuitable content.Children must be at least 13 to register on most social networking websites. But there’s not a lot standing in the way of children joining at a younger age.Age limits are there to keep children safe so you shouldn’t feel pressurised into letting younger children join these websites.Children and young people may chat or become “friends” with people on social networks or online games, even if they don’t know them or have never met them in person. The percentage of online friends that children didn’t know outside of being online was:
12 % for 8 -11 years olds in 2012
29% for 12-15 Year olds in 2013
This makes children vulnerable to bullying, grooming and sharing personal information.

Children in the UK have the 2nd highest number of social networking contacts in Europe:
26% of children had between 100 and 300 “friends”
16% had more than 300 “friends” .Grooming is when someone builds an emotional connection with a child to gain their trust for the purposes of secual abuse or exploitation.

Children and young people can be groomed online or in the real world, by a stranger or by someone they know – for example a family member, friend or professional.
Groomers may be male or female. They could be any age.

Many children and young people don’t understand that they have been groomed, or that what has happened is abuse.

Groomers can use social media sites, instant messaging apps including teen dating apps, or online gaming platforms to connect with a young person or child. They can spend time learning about a young person’s interests from their online profiles and then use this knowledge to help them build up a relationship.It’s easy for groomers to hide their identity online – they may pretend to be a child and then chat and become “friends” with children they are targeting. Groomers may look for
usernames or comments that are firtatious or have a sexual meaning
public comments that suggest a child has low self-esteem or is vulnerable.

Groomers don’t always target a particular child. Sometimes they will send messages to hundreds of young people and wait to see who responds. Groomers no longer need to meet children in real life to abuse them. Increasingly, groomers are sexually exploiting their victims by persuading them to take part in online sexual activity
Q7.2. Describes ways of reducing risk to children and young people from:
Children and young people spend an average of 12 hours a week online and it becomes part of their routine early on in life. That’s why it’s important to start talking to your child about keeping safe online at an early age. It’s easier to have conversations about online safety little and often, rather than trying to cover everything at once.

As your children get older, and technology changes, make sure you keep talking about what they’re doing online and how to stay safe. Ask your child to show you their favorite things to do online, and show an interest in what they do – just like you would onine. This will give you a much better idea of what they’re getting up to. And it gives you a way to support and encourage them while learning what they know.Children don’t think of people they’ve met online through social networking and online games as strangers, they’re just online friends. So it’s important to keep track of who your child’s talking to. Ask them questions like:
who do they know that has the most online friends?
how can they know so many people?
how do they choose who to become friends with online?
Explain to your child that it’s easy for people to lie about themselves online, like their age, for example, because you have never met them. Agree your child will “friend” a trusted adult on their social networks or online games. You could also become “friends” with your child so you can see their profile and posts but your child may not want to “friend” you, especially as they get older. Agree that your child can “friend” a trusted adult like an aunt or uncle so they can let you know if the” see anything worrying on your child’s profile. It’s useful to agree on some ground rules together. These will depend on your child’s age and what you feel is right for them, but you might want to consider
the amount of time they can spend online
when they can go online
the websites they can visit or activities they can take part in
sharing images and videos
how to treat people online and not post anything they wouldn’t say face-to-fa!e.If your child plays online games
check the age rating before they play
make sure you know who they’re playing with
talk to them about what information is OK to share with other players
negotiate the amount of time they spend playing online games.

You know your child best, so check that the websites, social networks and games the’re using are suitable for them. Check that your browser’s homepage (the page that you see when you open an internet window) is set to a website that you’re happy for your child to see. Online games, movies and some websites will also have an age rating or minimum age to sign up. Age limits are there to keep children safe. So you shouldn’t feel pressured into letting your child sign up or use websites that you feel they are too young for. Setting up parental controls to stop your child from seeing unsuitable or harmful content online
Internet service Providers (ISPs), such as Virgin Media, Talk Talk. Sky or BT provide controls to help you filter or restrict content.

Laptops? phones? tablets? game consoles and other devices that connect to the internet have settings to activate parental controls.

Software packages are available – some for free – that can help you filter? restrict or monitor what your child can see online. Remember that if your child goes online away from home? the same controls might not be in place at other people’s houses or on public WiFi. Agree with your child how they will use public WiFi or let other parents know what your child is isn’t allowed to do online. As your child gets older you can change the level of control that you use. If your child asks you to remove the controls completely? and you are happy to do so? make sure you agree what behavior is acceptable online First, Check the privacy settings on any online accounts your child has? like Facebook or games? and remind them to keep their personal information private.And talk to your child about what to do if they see content or are contacted by someone that worries or upsets them. Take sure they know how to use tools to report abuse+++++
a – social networking
b – internet use
c – bullying online
d – using a mobile phone
REFENCES
Q1.1
http://www.academia.edu/21401767/Y_601_1695_CYP_Core_3.3_Understand_how_to_safeguard_the_wellbeing_of_Children_and_Young_People_Y_601_1695_1._Understand_the_main_Legislation_guidelines_policies_and_procedures_for_safeguarding_Children_and_Young_People
www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2002/38/contentshttps://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/child-protection-system/england/legislation-policy-guidance/Q1.3
http://www.silkysteps.com/forum/showthread.php?t=15435
http://www.silkysteps.com/pages-cypw…3-diploma.html
http://www.silkysteps.com/forum/showthread.php?t=14145Q3.2
https://www.bartleby.com/essay/Unit-333-3-2-Explain-Policies-and-F3CF7Y6JVCREFERENCE
http://www.academia.edu/21401767/Y_601_1695_CYP_Core_3.3_Understand_how_to_safeguard_the_wellbeing_of_Children_and_Young_People_Y_601_1695_1._Understand_the_main_Legislation_guidelines_policies_and_procedures_for_safeguarding_Children_and_Young_PeopleQ2.3. Explain what is meant by partnership working in the context or safeguarding
https://www.silkysteps.com/forum/showthread.php?p=63169
Q1.4. Explain when and why injuries and serious case reviews and required:
In our school data protection and information handling with regards to safeguarding children is taken very seriously. Still we need to keep children information to follow up their learning progress and all this information is kept on locked computers in which all teachers have their own passwords to access this. The main computer can be accessed to see what times the teachers have logged on and the exact pages they have looked at. Regular meetings are held at the school regarding data protection and any new ways in which we can achieve this. All contact details for children and staff are kept in the office in a locked cupboard and only the persons who have access to the key can access this data. Also all the staff sign a confidentiality form when they start their employment with the school to say they will not discuss any information regarding a child or other staff member with people who it does not concern. For example if a member of staff was talking about a child on the bus saying that this particular child wasn’t doing well at school because you thought they were having problems at home, someone who knows the child and his family may be on the bus listening. This could then have devastating effects on the child and his family.
Serious Cases (SC) Standing Panel will meet as soon as possible following the referral for consideration and always within two weeks. The primary task for the standing Panel is to consider the available information in order to make a recommendation to the CYSCB about whether the criteria to undertake an SCR? are met. To undertake this role they will have at their meeting:
Copies of notification document to Ofsted including basic information
Notes from the chair where referral is made directly to the chair
Copies of notes from multi-Agency ?Rapid response meetings where applicable
Establish what lessons are to be learned from the case about the way in which local professionals and organisations work individually and together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children?
Identify clearly what those lessons are both within and between agencies, how and within what timescales they will be acted on, and what is expected to change as a result?
Improve intra and inter-agency working?
Better safeguard and promote the welfare of children
A child sustains a potentially life-threatening injury or serious and permanent impairment of physical and/or mental health and development through abuse or neglect, or
-A Child has been seriously harmed as a result of being subject to sexual abuse? or
-A parent has been murdered and a domestic homicide review is being initiated under the Domestic Violence Act 2004?
-A child has been seriously harmed following a violent assault by another child or adult
The case gives rise to concerns about the way in which local professionals and services worked together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. This includes interagency and/ or inter disciplinary working. Any agency or professional may refer a case to the LSCB where it is believed the criteria for a Serious Case Review are met. Motivation should be made to the LSCB Manager, who will inform and discuss the case with the Chair of the SCR Sub Group. The notifiation will be reviewed by the SCR Sub Group in line with these procedures and working together 2013. The SCR Sub Group will then make a recommendation to the Chair of the LSCB. In some cases the criteria will be clearly met and the Chair will decide immediately that an SCR should be conducted.

All child deaths should be reported to the CDOP business support manager. It is their responsibility to inform the LSCB manager. Any professional who becomes aware of a child who has died or has been seriously injured and abuse or neglect is suspected must complete a serious inscident notication , or which should be sent to the safeguarding Unit to inform them of the death or injury.

Child protection in England Serious case reviews. A serious case review (SCR) takes place after a child dies or is seriously injured and abuse or neglect is thought to be involved. It looks at lessons that can help prevent similar incidents from happening in the future.

Serious case reviews are undertaken when a child or young person dies where abuse or neglect is known or suspected to be a factor in the death. Serious care reviews are set up to see what lessons can be learnt from the death about the way in which local professionals and organisations work separately and together to help safeguard and promote the welfare of the children and young people. It is also set up to improve how they can work better together to ensure nothing like that happened again.

In my setting data protection and information handling with regards to safeguarding children is taken very seriously. Although we need to keep information on pupils so that we can support their teaching and learning and so we can report on their progress, all this information is kept on locked computers in which all teachers have their own passwords to access this. The main computer can be accessed to see what times the teachers have logged on and the exact pages they have looked at. Regular meetings are held at the school regarding data protection and any new ways in which we can achieve this. All contact details for children and staff are kept in the office in a locked cupboard and only the persons who have access to the key can access this data. Also all the staff sign a confidentiality form when they start their employment with the school to say they will not discuss any information regarding a child or other staff member with people who it does not concern. For example if a member of staff was talking about a child on the bus saying that this particular child wasn’t doing well at school because you thought they were having problems at home, someone who knows the child and his family may be on the bus listening. This could then have devastating effects on the child and his family.
Baby Peter was born on the 1st March 2006; he suffered severe injuries which were inflicted whilst he was in his mothers care. His mother pleaded guilty to causing the death of a child and she and her lodger were found guilty on the 11th November 2008. Peter was part of a multi- agency child protection plan and was known to have been seen more than 60 occasions by professionals before his death on August 3rd 2007 aged just 17 months.

The agencies involved were too willing to believe Peters’ mothers account of events. They seemed to be very trusting of Peter’s mother who was reinforced by her presentation and behaviour such as; co-operating with professionals and appointments, positive response to offers of help, initiation of communications with professionals, relaying information between them. After the Baby P incident there were many things which were looked into and the agency were found to be; lacking urgency, lacking thoroughness, insufficiently challenging to the parent, lacking action in response to reasonable interface, insufficiently focussed on the child’s welfare, based on too high a threshold for intervention and based on expectations that were too low.

Overall the result of the Baby P incident meant a review on the child protection plan.

What are your roles and responsibilities for reporting information on possible abuse to a senior colleague or external agency and how and to whom should you pass on information from a child or young person’s allegations of abuse.
If any member of staff is concerned about a child he or she must inform the designated senior person (in my case it would be my mentor, who is also the deputy manager). Any information regarding the concerns must be recorded by the member of staff on the same day on a ’cause for concern’ sheet, this has an outline of a body on and any marks need to be recorded accurately. It must be a factual account of the observations and must be kept in the manager’s office in a locked cupboard. My mentor will then decide if this should be referred to the Children’s Schools and Families, this may be done without the consent from the parents. All staff including me needs to be updated on policies so that everyone is up to date on the awareness of abuse.

This is what i put and i’ve had it signed off! hope this helps x
According to the local safeguarding board regulations 2006, serious case reviews will be required in situations where a child has died due to known or suspected abuse or neglect. Sometimes reviews may be carried out where a child has been seriously harmed or suffered life threatening injuries.
Serious case reviews are used for agencies to discuss the case together and to determine the lessons which are to be learned about the way in which professionals have worked and which can work together in the future. A report will then be written which will be made public so that recommendations are known when undertaking a serious case review. The process to follow is in the DCSF publication working together to safeguard children 2010.

Serious case reviews are crucial as they examine all agencies involved to ensure that they are actively involved and working together as they should be. When professionals are found to be negligent in their involvement or procedures, the review is able to highlight where the mistakes were made.

It is very important that all agencies communicate and cooperate with each other to protect children and young people from harm and abuse and to promote health and safety for children and young people. A serious case review (SCR) takes place after a child dies or is seriously injured and abuse or neglect is thought to be involved. It looks at lessons that can help prevent similar incidents from happening in the future. Other parts of the UK have their own systems in place to learn from cases. We always follow and abide by guidelines and work with law especially it is regard with protection of a child to make sure all children are safe. For example at school, if we are concerned about a child we must inform the designated senior officer without delay and record any information regarding our concerns. Everything should be recorded on the same day on a cause of the concern and any information regarding the concern should be kept in the manager’s office in a locked cabinet. So the agencies can make a serious case reviews about what happen if parents failed their duties and the child is suffering from abuse or neglect.

Q1.5. Explain how the processes used by own work setting or services comply with legislation that covers data protection, information handling and sharing:
-Be open and honest with the person (and/or their family where appropriate) from the outset about why, what, how and with whom information will, or could be shared, and seek their agreement, unless it is unsafe or inappropriate to do so.

-Seek advice if you are in any doubt, without disclosing the identity of the person where possible.

-Share with consent where appropriate and, where possible, respect the wishes of those who do not consent to share confidential information. You may still share information without consent if, in your judgement, that lack of consent can be overridden in the public interest. You will need to base your judgement on the facts of the case.

-Consider safety and well-being:
-Necessary, proportionate, relevant, accurate, timely and secure:
Maintaining Records
The registered manager is responsible for the standard of day to day care delivered and the functioning of the home. The records evidence this. in a day to day basis this may be delegated to other members of the !are team, with managerial oversight being maintained through the supervisory process. New carers joining the team are inducted into the administrative information and recording requirements of the home.Confdentiality of records, records are confdential which means that when not in use they are to be stored in a lockable filing cabinet and available only to:
– The care team working with the young person
– The young person who is the subject of the file
-The young person is social worker, team manager
Registered manager is responsible individual other persons requesting access to information held on file should submit their request in writing. Parents have no automatic right to have ccess to these files. The young people should be encouraged to read and contribute to their records where required or appropriate. The care team should ensure that the young people are:
Supervised to avoid possible damage to the records
Storage of records
Documents and case files should not be removed from the premises where they are normally kept unless, it is necessary and appropriate to have them available elsewhere for reference purposes and within acceptable boundaries of professional practice. However, authorisation must be given by the registered manager. All records must be stored safely until the expiry date of statutory time limits. It is important that all log records are stored? since these provide the detailed day by day picture of the young person’s stay at the home and they may subsequently wish to have access to them. However, records can be stored on site.

Transferring of Records
When young people are discharged their records are achived and forwarded to head office. Where possible these are then returned to the Placing Authority for safe storage. ,o(e records may be copied and transfer with the young person? where they are relevant to the transition of the young person to a new care provider. This may include the Health Plan? basic information and arrangements for contact with significant others to ensure that this information is immediately available.

Storage of Records
All records must be stored safely until the expiry date of statutory time limits. It is important that all log records are stored, since these provide the detailed day by day picture of the young person is stay at the home and they may subsequently wish to have access to them.

Responsibilities and points for Good Practice
-The care team must ensure that all records:
-Are accurate and factual, brief, clear, consistent and concise, written as soon as possible after an event has occurred
-Are written in such a manner that text cannot be erased and that any alterations or additions are dated? timed and signed
-Readable, free from jargon and understandable
-Up to date and complete
-Distinguish fact from opinion
-not be open to interpretation
-Be free from bias
-be in plain appropriate language
-Identify the name of the young person
-Identify third party contributions
-Record the views of the young people
-Record professional judgements and who took particular decisions
-Record the views of family members
-Record disagreements amongst those involved in the decision making or plans
-Re!ord where and when young people have been given verbal or written information
-Use the home’s recording systems
-Be legible – typed if the rerord is in a public domain? e.g. assessment and care plans
-Be legible – written clearly in black ink if the records are for internal use? e.g. running records
-Not use correction fluid
-Not have spaces between entries made at different times
-Identify who’s record it is
-Be dated and signed by the writer and clearly printed
-Be cross referenced to other documentation
The registered manager is required to:
-Monitor the content and quality of records through monthly monitoring checks to assess the performance of the care team and the functioning of the home
-To sign the homes records at least once a month, to identify any patterns or issues requiring action and take action to improve or adLust provisions where necessary
The independent/reg 44 visitor is required to:
-Undertake monthly inspections of the home
-Assess the quality of the recording
-Ensure that all recording meets regulatory requirements
-Review and comment on any trends/patterns of behaviour relating to the young people
-Continually assess whether the young people?s needs are being (et appropriately
-Produce a report and action plan following each visit
Placing information in the confidential section of the file
Certain information held on young people should be placed in the confidential section of their file, such information would not normally be accessible to the young person
SHOW MORE
It is not bad to share information if it is for the safety of a child or young people. In some situations, sharing information is the solution to improve the beneficial outcomes for all children. It is important to facilitate early intervention for safeguarding children. Staffs working with children should know and understand what to do about children who are at risk of abuse or neglect. It is essential to enable early intervention if the child is at risk of suffering harm. All data protection should be taken seriously and kept on secured computers. All staffs should have their own passwords to access the network.
Q3.1 Explain why it is important to ensure children and young people are protected from harm within the setting:
STAYING SAFE
Clear, explicit and well understood Child Protection Procedures are also essential. Safeguarding children is central to everything we do and aim to achieve with and for the Young women placed at Cornerways. The young women referred to us as well as subsequently placed with us are particularly vulnerable to a whole range of issues and threats. We must therefore endeavour to make sure that our policies, procedures and practises promote and protect their safetyand wellbeing promoting a warm, nurturing, and secure environment where the Young feel cared for, contained and invested in and therefore want to be taking appropriate action to protect young woman from potential or actual risks. The poli!ies and procedures in this section are central to achieving these aims, however they also interrelate with those in all the other areas of the manual, which collectively contribute to ensuring the young woman’s safety.In particular it is our belief that a thorough referral and assessment process is key to ensuring that a young woman’s needs can be safely and appropriately met by Cornerways and that their needs are consistent with those of the other young women.Comprehensive and proactive behaviour management strategies and approaches are vital to ensure good order and discipline and the creation of a positive care environment. Competent, motivated staff and well functioning staff teams are essential to the above aims and the delivery of a quality child care service generally. Central to achieving this are good recruitment, selection and vetting processes, and effective staff training and support.

Sexual abuse is defined as forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening.

-Always stop and listen straight away to someone who wants to tell you about incidents of, or suspicion of abuse.

-Be alert to the fact that when a child discloses information about abuse to a member of staff, it may be done obliquely, rather than directly and maybe limited in detail.

-Children and young people often tell other young people, rather than staff or other adults, about abuse and these young people may then pass this information to staff.

-An abused child is likely to be under severe emotional stress and the staff member may be the adult with whom the child feels safe to talk.


-Then the child discloses in confidence, the member of staff will need to display tact and sensitivity in responding.

– The member of staff will need to reassure the child, and retain his/her trust, whilst explaining the need to inform other professionals.

In any discussions with the child:
DO
Be accessible and receptive
listen carefully,
Take it seriously
reassure the child that she is right to tell
negotiate getting help
Find help quickly
Make careful records of all that was said using the child’s own words? as soon as is practicable following the disclosure. Date, time and sign the record. This record may be used in subsequent legal proceedings.

DO NOT
Jump to conclusions directly,
question the child,
try to get the child to disclose all of the details
speculate or accuse anybody
make promises you cannot keep
ask leading questions that could give your own idea of what may have happened. Do not prompt words to use (e.g. “Did he do X to you”)Instead ask, “What do you want to tell me”? –or Is there anything else you want to say? Give a guarantee that whatever has been said will be kept confidential. If you are told about abuse you have a responsibility to report it (see below). If asked, explain that, if you are going to be told something very important that involves the young woman’s safety and it needs to be sorted out? You will need to tell the people who can do this, but that you will only tell people who have to know. Discuss with the manager whether any steps need to be taken to protect the person who has told you about the abuse. (This may need to be discussed with the person who told you)