Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a very dangerous disease caused by a virus that can be passed between people by touching and body fluids. We all know it is a dangerous disease but how do you contract, treat, and hopefully avoid other medical complications. I think that if we can, we should try our hardest to try and cure HIV/AIDS. This illness, known as primary or acute HIV infection, may last a few weeks. Possible signs and symptoms include: fever, headache, muscle aches, joint pain, rash, sore throat, painful mouth sores, and swollen lymph glands that are mainly on the neck. There’s no cure for HIV/AIDS, but there are medications that can dramatically slow the progression of the disease. These drugs have reduced AIDS deaths in many developed nations. The symptoms of HIV and AIDS vary, depending on the phase of infection. These symptoms can be so mild that you might not even notice them. However, the amount of virus in your bloodstream (viral load) is quite high at this time. As a result, the infection spreads more easily during primary infection than during the next stage.
HIV is a virus spread through certain body fluids that attacks the body’s immune system , specifically the cd4 cells, often called t cells. Over time, HIV can destroy so many of these cells that the body can’t fight off infections and diseases. These special cells help the immune system fight off infections. Untreated, HIV reduces the number of cd4 cells (t cells) in the body. This damage to the immune system makes it harder and harder for the body to fight off infections and some other diseases. Opportunistic infections or cancers take advantage of a very weak immune system and signal that the person has AIDS. HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It is the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS if not treated. Unlike some other viruses, the human body can’t get rid of HIV completely, even with treatment. So once you get HIV, you have it for life. HIV attacks the body’s immune system, specifically the CD4 cells(t cells) which help the immune system fight off infections. Untreated, HIV reduces the number of cd4 cells(t cells ) in the body, making the person more likely to get other infections or infection-related cancers.
Over time, HIV can destroy too many of these cells that the body can’t fight off
infections and disease. These opportunistic infections and cancers take advantage of a very weak immune system and signal that the person has AIDS, the last stage of HIV infection. No effective cure currently exists, but with proper medical care, HIV can be controlled. The medicine used to treat HIV is called antiretroviral therapy or ART, and if taken the right way, every day, this medicine can dramatically prolong the lives of many people infected with HIV. It can keep them healthy and greatly lower their chance of infecting others. Before the introduction of ART in the mid 1990s, people with HIV could progress to AIDS in just a few years. Today, if someone is diagnosed with HIV and treated before the disease is too far advanced, they can live nearly as long as someone who does not have HIV. Scientists have identified a type of chimpanzee in central Africa as the source of HIV infection in humans. They believe that the chimpanzee version of the immunodeficiency virus (called simian immunodeficiency virus, or SIV) most likely was transmitted to humans and mutated into HIV when humans hunted these chimpanzees for meat and came into contact with their infected blood. Studies show that HIV may have jumped from apes to humans as far back as the late 1800s, over decades, the virus slowly spread across Africa and later into other parts of the world. We know that the virus has existed in the United States at least the mid to late 1970s.
When people get HIV and doesn’t receive treatment; they will typically progress through three stages of disease. Medicine to treat HIV, known as Antiretroviral Therapy (ART), helps people at all stages of the disease if taken the right way, every day. Treatment can slowly or prevent progression from one stage to the next. It can also dramatically reduce the chance of transmitting HIV to someone else. HIV is a virus that attacks the immune system. If untreated, a person’s immune system will eventually be completely destroyed. AIDS refers to a set of symptoms and illness that occur at the very final stage of HIV infection. Regularly for HIV means you can access treatment if you need it to stay healthy. The virus destroys a type of white blood cell in the immune system called a T-helper cell, and makes copies of itself inside these cells. T-helper cells are also referred to as CD4 cells. As HIV destroys more CD4 cells and makes more copies of itself, it gradually breaks down a person’s immune system. This means someone living with HIV, who is not receiving treatment, will find it harder and harder to fight off infections and diseases. If HIV is left untreated, it may take up to 10 or 15 years for the immune system to be so severely damaged it can no longer defend itself at all. However, the speed HIV progress will vary depending on age, health and background. HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. There is effective antiretroviral treatment available so people with HIV can live a normal, healthy life. The earlier HIV is diagnosed, the sooner treatment can start- leading to better long term health. So regular testing for HIV is important.
HIv is found in semen, blood, vaginal, and anal fluids, and breast milk. HIV cannot be transmitted through sweat, saliva or urine. Using male condoms or female condoms during sex is the best way to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. HIV is sexually transmitted infection( sti). It can also be spread by contact with infected blood or from mother to child during pregnancy, childbirth or breast feeding. By damaging your immune system, HIV interferes with your body’s ability to fight the organisms that cause disease. Without medication, it may take years before HIV weakens your immune system to the point that you have AIDS. these drugs have reduced AIDS deaths in many developed nations. The symptoms of HIV and AIDS vary, depending on the phase of infection. Most people infected by HIV develop a flu-like illness within a month or two after the virus enters the body. This illness, known as primary or acute HIV infection, may last for a few weeks. Possible signs and symptoms include: fever, headache , muscle aches and joint pain, rash.