“A Letter from Birmingham Jail” was written by Martin Luther King

“A Letter from Birmingham Jail” was written by Martin Luther King, Jr., also known as MLK, about clergymen from Alabama. This letter sparked the clergyman’s interest and while he sat in a jail cell for marching without a permit, it allowed him time to think about things and respond critically to oppressing people. MLK’s letter addresses many specific thoughts that were presented to the Clergymen’s and this direct response portrays MLK, it gave strong points through his writing. Some Unethical and immoral mentions came to the attention of the Minister through the letter that MLK wrote, and he expressed that he had different views and defended his ideas by comparing himself to Aristotle’s three rhetorical devices, ethos, logos, and pathos. Being able to bond with the audience by explaining the obstacles that helped transformed to what he fought for that is now. MLK made a greater impact to his reader, and his effectiveness use of persuasive language enables him to open up the clergyman’s mind to see the true injustice going on in Birmingham. MLK used three techniques, use of appeal to authority or ethos, use of logic or logos, and the use of emotional appeal. MLK shows his talent as a speaker and enables him to reach sympathy from even the toughest of the clergymen.
MLK presented himself in a position where he introduces himself as “The President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization operating in every southern state, with headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. (King) A good point that MLK establishes is on page seven of “Letter from Birmingham Jail” where MLK states that he has traveled to and from Alabama, Mississippi, and all the other southern states during both summer and fall seasons. This shows his credibility to defend that not only did he travel once but he traveled multiple times throughout the years and have attended many trials. Also, throughout the letter, MLK keeps referring back to the Bible, president and writers to establish his passion for Christ as a minister but also to show himself a well-educated man. While he speaks to the Clergyman his emotional appeal may not have been sympathy or empathy but disappointment. MLK indicates that because of their religious beliefs, they should have been more proactive for justice rather than accepting. Instead of seating around waiting for things to change, we should fight for what needs to be changed.
Throughout MLK letter, after he addresses his credentials and validates himself through his knowledgeable and strong rebuttals of logic, his disagreement plays further into the mindful of his audience through well put references and emotional instances. One powerful example of MLK’s pull on the reader’s consciousness in his letter is on page three when he refutes the argument of the Clergymen saying that Colored people should just “wait”. While many words truly stand out, MLK’s true effect was mastered by the appeal to the parents in the group, When you fabricate answer to answer to questions such as, “Daddy, why white people treat colored people so mean” (“Letter from Birmingham Jail”) it makes you feel humiliated day in and time out by spiteful racism and not to feel like “you are forever fighting a degenerating sense of “nobodiness” (“Letter from Birmingham Jail). Another element that helps support MLK’s point in his letter is the fervent repetition of his blatant disappointment in more than simply the clergymen, but their Christian faith and the churches in commission among Alabama throughout now. MLK repeats how disappointed he was in the “common whites” also and their bystander reactions to racial issues. The fact that this man, a minister, “beneath” the aforesaid extremist white clergymen, and inhabiting a cell throughout that point, World Health Organization was unsuccessful in individuals showed a real depth which hit the audience profoundly.
I feel that MLK was very successful in persuading the audience to understand that segregation is a problem, soon after Civil Rights started making its way into everyone’s home and a year later segregation state and local laws became abolished. MLK fought each time something was segregated to bring these situation to other people’s attention and to bring hope that they would be changed. The letter really sparked the Civil Rights Movement and really helped people to understand the importance to act on things because time is of the essence and this problem was never going to solve itself by ignoring the situation.